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Homa Health Newsletter #133

  13th May 2017

HOMA HEALTH - NEWSLETTER 133

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EDITOR'S NOTE
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HOMA HEALINGS
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HOMA FARMING
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ECO NEWS
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EVENTS
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FUTURE EVENTS
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SCIENTIFIC ASPECTS OF
AGNIHOTRA

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MESSAGES FROM SHREE VASANT
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FROM INTUITIVE GUIDANCE
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DETACHMENT

   Let us continue with more self-study (Swadhyaaya). Today we will speak of “Detachment” (Vairaghya in Sanskrit).

It is very natural to want to touch an object and take it with our hands to get some benefit from it. By the way, it is the first thing we do at birth when we seek the mother's breast to feed us. As we "grow," we discover other objects and other benefits in possessing them.
This is normal and natural when we also "release it" or "leave it" without any pain.

The problem is that sometimes we do not want to let go and we cling too much to something.
It's like a child who does not want to leave a toy because he's afraid someone will take it away. This can happen to anyone with any object or with another person. It is a kind of irrational dependence or habit.
This can be seen even in the mental or emotional field when one does not leave past negative experiences behind, or fixes on erroneous concepts or limiting attitudes that do not allow us to grow or be free.

Of course, there are positive thoughts and emotions that work as stakes that help us to climb a mountain or a rope that pulls us out of the water.

 



DETACHMENT is not that you cannot own something, it is that nothing owns you.
- Ali ibn Abi Talib

However, “He is weak who has it and refuses to let it go, as well as he who does not have it and does not dare to take it, if both are motivated by fear.”
To understand the above a little better, let us remember how they trap the monkey in some parts. A cage or coconut is tightly attached to a tree. A banana is placed inside the coconut or cage through a small hole that allows the monkey to introduce the hand. But when the monkey grabs the banana with his hand, he cannot take it out since the fist is bigger than the hole. Usually, the monkey reaches in, picks up the banana and pulls it and starts jumping and screaming without separating from the coconut or cage, catching the attention of the monkey hunters until he gets tired, but not letting go of the banana.
So, the monkey is caught.

Another option would be "to drop" the banana and pull out the hand and "be free".
And better yet, would be to remove the banana with something thin that does not get stuck in the hole.


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